Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.

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Serving Galveston
and
the Entire Houston
Area

(COON)

(COON)

Insect Control Services for Galveston & The Greater Houston Area

Insect Control Services for Galveston & The Greater Houston Area

Insect infestations can be simply annoying or pose a serious threat to your property and the health of the inhabitants. Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc. can assist with a wide range of insect problems. Whether you have ants, roaches, bees, silverfish or any other insect problem, we have you covered. Our experienced staff has the expertise needed to provide a thorough removal of existing pests and prevent future pests.

Contact us today to protect you and your family from irritating and possibly dangerous insect invaders.

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Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.
Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.Hal started his first animal control business in the mid-70’s doing strictly animal trapping and animal proofing. He received his certification from TEA to teach animal management in the mid 1980’s as part of his animal control business. He sold the business in 1999 but remained active in wildlife work as a trapper of wild hogs, licensed nuisance alligator trapper, and breeder of wallabies. Hal also works with two game ranches, a gator farm and airboat ecological tours in Galveston Bay. In 2009, Hal decided to pursue his interest in an animal control business again by opening Animal Control-Wildlife, Inc.

Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.Coyotes are currently under a statewide rabies quarantine imposed by the Texas Department of Health and it is prohibited to transport or release a live coyote in the State of Texas without a license to do so. Coyote sightings are usually reported during the night but have been seen in the daylight hours too especially at dawn and dusk. Many people mistake the coyote for a dog due to the fact that coyotes are the size of a medium sized dog with thick long fur. They have a bushy, long tail with a black tip that is usually carried in a down position. Their nose is slender and long and their ears are pointed. They range in color from light tan, dark tan, red, grayish black, and blonde and are often mistaken for a German Shepherd.